National Map
Come Heat and High Water: Climate Risk in the Southeastern U.S. and Texas

The Southeastern United States and Texas are uniquely at risk from climate change, according to a new report released today by the Risky Business Project. Read the report here.

Robert Rubin and Tom Steyer Urge Investors to Tackle Climate Risk

The Risky Business Project, in partnership with the Stanford Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, hosted 'Investing in a New Climate,' an event with Tom Steyer, investor, philanthropist and clean energy advocate, and Robert E. Rubin, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.

Read More

George Shultz: A Reagan approach to climate change

We all know there are those who have doubts about the problems presented by climate change. But if these doubters are wrong, the evidence is clear that the consequences, while varied, will be mostly bad, some catastrophic. So why don't we follow Reagan's example and take out an insurance policy?

Read More

New Report: More Extreme Heat is Coming to the Southeast

Atlanta, Georgia The Southeastern United States and Texas are uniquely at risk from climate change, according to a new report released today by the Risky Business Project – a non-partisan initiative chaired by Hank Paulson, Michael R. Bloomberg, and Tom Steyer. The report finds that across the region there is potential to significantly reduce these risks if policymakers and business leaders act to reduce emissions and adapt to a changing climate.

Read More

Bob Kopp: The Deadly Combination of Heat and Humidity

THE most deadly weather-related disasters aren't necessarily caused by floods, droughts or hurricanes. They can be caused by heat waves, like the sweltering blanket that's taken over 2,500 lives in India in recent weeks.

In work one of us (Robert Kopp) led for the Risky Business Project, we found that over the period from 1981 to 2010, the average American experienced about four dangerously humid days, with wet-bulb temperatures exceeding 80 degrees. By 2030, that level is expected to more than double, to about 10 days per summer.

Read More

What’s the Economic Risk From Climate Change?

Too often in the U.S., the climate conversation falls down one of two partisan rabbit holes—ending up either focused on the question of whether the science is “real” or whether one particular policy solution is a job killer or creator. In falling into these familiar debates, both supporters and opponents miss a basic question: How much economic risk do we face from climate change?

Read More

  • Michael R. Bloomberg
  • Henry M. Paulson
  • Tom Steyer
  • Henry Cisneros
  • Gregory Page
  • Robert Rubin
  • Donna Shalala
  • George Shultz
  • Olympia Snowe
  • Al Sommer